What Are The Best Jobs For Maths Graduates?

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Maths graduates are in high demand and can find many different jobs that utilize their skills. This article helps you decide which job is best for your particular skills and interests by covering 5 maths-based jobs!

1) Actuary

An actuary uses maths to help companies manage risk. They use statistics and probability to assess the likelihood that certain events might occur, such as natural disasters or accidents. After evaluating these risks, actuaries then make plans for how their company can handle any negative outcomes. The average salary of an actuary is £87,410 per year*.

A career in this field would be perfect if you like mathematics but also enjoy working with people! Actuarial work involves communicating findings to both managers and employees who are affected by them. This job requires strong mathematical skills (you will need at least a bachelor’s degree) but it doesn’t require extensive prior experience; many positions only ask that applicants have completed college-level courses in math, statistics, and finance.

2) Statistician

Statisticians use maths to help companies make better decisions. They design surveys and experiments, collect data from those sources, analyse that information using statistical techniques, and then communicate their findings in a clear report. The average salary of a statistician is £47,745 per year*.

A career in this field would be perfect if you like mathematics but also enjoy working with people! Statisticians work closely with managers to solve problems by evaluating past trends or testing new ideas; they often present these results both orally (at meetings) and through written reports. This job requires strong mathematical skills (you will need at least a bachelor’s degree), as well as experience with computers—statistical software is constantly evolving so it helps to be familiar with this technology!

Statisticians work in government, education, and healthcare sectors, these are just three examples. This means that there is no single job path for statisticians; they can move up the ranks (for example from analyst to manager) or even change jobs over time as their interests evolve.

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3) Financial Analyst

Financial analysts use maths to help companies make better financial decisions. Their goal is to study current market trends and assess the viability of potential investments, helping their company avoid bad risks while identifying good opportunities for growth. The average salary of a financial analyst is £51,500 per year.

A career in this field would be perfect if you like mathematics but also enjoy working with people! Financial analysts work closely with managers on specific projects; they gather information about particular sectors or industries by reading reports from other investors, summarizing their findings into concise memos that are presented at meetings. This job requires strong mathematical abilities (you will need at least an undergraduate degree) as well as experience with computers—financial software is constantly evolving so it helps to have familiarity with this technology!

Financial analysts work in a variety of settings government, education, and healthcare are just three examples. This means that there is no single job path for financial analysts; they can move up the ranks (for example from analyst to manager) or even change jobs over time as their interests evolve.

4) Computer Programmer

Computer programmers use maths to design and test computer software. They turn the ideas of computer scientists (who focus more on theory) into real-life applications by translating their mathematical models into instructions that machines can understand. The average salary of a computer programmer is £37,452 per year.

A career in this field would be perfect if you like mathematics but also enjoy working with people! Computer programmers work closely with managers as well as colleagues who have expertise in other areas; they regularly communicate through email or phone calls about specific projects so strong communication skills are important for success here. This job requires both strong mathematical abilities (you will need at least an undergraduate degree) and experience using computers—at all different levels from coding languages to video game design—so it helps to have familiarity with this technology!

Computer programmers work in a variety of settings, most often for companies that make products or provide services. This means that there is no single job path for computer programmers; they can move up the ranks (for example from intern to lead) or even change jobs over time as their interests evolve.

5) Software Developer

Software developers use maths to design and test computer software. They turn the ideas of computer scientists (who focus more on theory) into real-life applications by translating their mathematical models into instructions that machines can understand. The average salary for this job is £48,286 per year.

A career in this field would be perfect if you like mathematics but also enjoy working with people! Software developers work closely with managers as well as colleagues who have expertise in other areas; they regularly communicate through email or phone calls about specific projects so strong communication skills are important for success here. This job requires both strong mathematical abilities (you will need at least an undergraduate degree) and experience using computers—at all different levels from coding languages to video game design—so it helps to have familiarity with this technology!

Software developers work in a variety of settings—most often for companies that make products or provide services. This means that there is no single job path for software developers; they can move up the ranks (for example from intern to lead) or even change jobs over time as their interests evolve.

Bonus Job

Economist

Economists use mathematics to analyze and solve problems related to finance, employment, inflation and other economic issues. The average salary for this job is £72,694 per year.

Economists work closely with managers (who tend to have a background in business) as well as colleagues who have expertise in other areas; they regularly communicate through email or phone calls about specific projects so strong communication skills are important for success here. This job requires both strong mathematical abilities (you will need at least an undergraduate degree, and many economists continue their studies with a master’s or PhD) and experience using computers—at all different levels from coding languages to video game design—so it helps to have familiarity with this technology!

Most of these careers are going to require you to have a good grade at A Level Maths. If you are looking for extra tips then you need to consider in attending one of our A Level Maths Revision Courses which take place throughout the academic year.

If you, or your parents would like to find out more, please just get in touch via email at info@exam.tips or call us on 0800 689 1272